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The Movie Novelizations Blog

I Read Movies – A Nightmare on Elm Street, Parts 1-3

I Read Movies – A Nightmare on Elm Street, Parts 1-3

Just in time for the Halloween season, host of the I Read Movies podcast Paxton Holley dives into a very special horror novelization that covers not one, but three movies in the A Nightmare on Elm Street franchise. Written by Jeffrey Cooper in 1987, The Nightmares on Elm street is the first in a two novelization series that covers the first five Elm Street movies. But how do the novelizations hold up? Listen as Paxton digs into the first book to discuss just...

I Read Movies – The Lost Boys

I Read Movies – The Lost Boys

On the latest episode of the I Read Movies podcast, host Paxton Holley is joined by pop culture historian Noel Thingvall to dig into the 1987 novelization of The Lost Boys adapted by the talented and prolific author Craig Shaw Gardner. Copies of Gardner's novelization are fairly rare and fetch upwards of $100 on the secondary market, so let Pax and Noel save you some bucks while they discuss how the book differs from the popular film. You can find the show on iTunes, Stitcher, or Google Play, or you can also stream it...

WTF did I just read: Ghostbusters

WTF did I just read: Ghostbusters

One of the largest hurdles in collecting movie novelizations is a devastating mixture of rarity and expense. Though on the whole, movie novelizations tend to be fairly cheap and moderately easy to find in better used book stores, there are a decent number of highly coveted titles, a lot of which are for some pretty popular films. So, say you're a fan of horror films and you're looking for copies of the Friday the 13th or Halloween novelizations. Unless you're willing to part with at least $100 per volume, usually sight unseen via sellers on eBay or Amazon third-party, you're probably...

From Book to Screen to Book Again

From Book to Screen to Book Again

Adaptation is a strange animal. How stories come to be presented in general can be an odd process, especially in modern times where collaboration and the lending of ideas from one writer to another is common. Or when you consider that most film scripts these days pass through not one or two writers, but usually upwards of six to ten in a "writer's room". It's not uncommon for studios to bring in well-known comedians to "punch up" family, animated and comedy scripts to get the most laughs per minute. Heck, before a script can even be adapted into a novelization, it has often already been...

Movie Novelizations International

Movie Novelizations International

The decision by a publisher, when it comes to what potential movies to adapt into novelizations, can be difficult and convoluted. What kind of advertising budget does the film have to supplement the cost of publication? Who is the target audience, and is it broad enough to maximize potential sales? Is there already built-in brand recognition that will offset the cost for additional advertising or product placement costs with stores? Can we find an author who produces manuscripts fast, cheap, and with just enough quality that studios won't be demanding multiple revisions before the...

I Read Movies – Who Wrote Roger Rabbit?

I Read Movies – Who Wrote Roger Rabbit?

In celebration of the 30th anniversary of the 1988 hit film Who Framed Roger Rabbit, Paxton Holley - host of the I Read Movies podcast - took a closer look at both the movie novelization (adapted by Martin Noble in '88) and the original 1981 novel (Who Censored Roger Rabbit) by Gary Wolf. If you've ever been curious about the differences between the original book, the film and adaptation, do yourself a favor and check out these two episodes, you'll be glad you...

On the Media Covers the Secret Life of Novelizations

On the Media Covers the Secret Life of Novelizations

We just recently stumbled upon this NPR piece (from WNYC) that aired during On The Media a couple years ago. Pretty fun and informative listen. Click on the image below to check out the WNYC page for this piece, or listen on the player below. The Secret Life of Novelizations Write a great book and you're a genius. Turn a book into a great film and you're a visionary. Turn a great film into a book...that's another story. Novelizations of films are regular best-sellers with cult followings -- some are even more beloved than the films that spawned them -- but respected they are...

I Read Movies – the Star Wars Saga

I Read Movies – the Star Wars Saga

Not only is Paxton Holley an avid fan of movie novelizations, but he's also a life-long fan of the Star Wars Saga. So we've been very happy that a good portion of his first crop of episodes has been dedicated to covering the famous (and sometimes infamous) adaptations (and sequels.)  In fact the latest episode of I Read Movies just dropped featuring an in depth look at James Kahn's 1983 novelization of Return of the Jedi. Previously Paxton has covered the following books... Star Wars Star Wars: The Last Jedi Star Wars: Splinter of the Mind's...

WTF did I just read: Robocop

WTF did I just read: Robocop

In the realm of movie novelizations, there are a handful of books that just seem, well, unlikely. Whether it's an adaptation of a film that just does not seem like it would make for a good book (like Three Amigos), or one that would have an uphill battle of trying to recreate the visceral, sometimes mind-blowing, imagery that is on the screen. In the late 80s Dutch director Paul Verhoeven, writers Edward Neumeier & Michael Miner, and an amazing cast and crew created a film that has yet to be matched in terms of maniacal mix of audacity, violence, beauty, and satire. Robocop burst into...

Wait, It Was Based on a Book?!

Wait, It Was Based on a Book?!

Over the years that we've been collecting movie novelizations there have been some pretty awesome finds at used bookstores that left our minds buzzing on a collector's high. But sometimes, when we get home and look more closely at our new score we realize that we were duped by the ever-present tie-in, and we're left scratching our heads with the knowledge that there are some odd films that were actually based on pre-existing novels. These film tie-in books are typically re-released versions of novels with all new cover artwork or photos that feature imagery from the movie, a few pages of...