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The Movie Novelizations Blog

No Novelization? No Problem!

For every film that has an associated novelization, there are probably fifty to a hundred that don't. Since the heyday of the film-to-book adaptations has long since passed, it makes us wonder sometimes how the genre manages to continue, especially when it seems like there are wide swaths of movie releases that could benefit from a tie-in novelization. These days only the largest blockbusters tend to receive the adaptation treatment, and usually it's only science-fiction or fantasy related films that have books published. Movies like Ghostbusters (the 2016 remake), Kong of Skull Island,...

I Read Movies – Episode I: The Phantom Menace

Not only is Paxton Holley an avid fan of movie novelizations, but he's also a life-long fan of the Star Wars Saga. So we've been very happy that he has been dedicating a lot of his coverage of novelizations to the Star Wars franchise and some of the famous (and sometimes infamous) adaptations (and sequels.) In fact the latest episode of I Read Movies just dropped featuring an in depth look at Terry Brook's 1999 novelization of Episode I: The Phantom Menace.   Previously Paxton has covered the following Star Wars books... Star Wars Star Wars: The Empire Strikes Back Star Wars: Return...

The Indispensable Index

The hobby of reading and collecting movie novelizations is a niche one to be sure, so one would figure that with little competition from other collectors and readers that it would be fairly easy to find these books. The thing is, there's a huge problem that most collectors have to surmount before one can even begin to worry about availability, and that is knowing what to collect. This might sound silly, but there really isn't any good accounting of what has been published over the years, and many fans and collectors just don't know what's floating around out there in used bookstores and...

The State of Novelizations in 1981

We recently stumbled upon a very interesting article in the New York Times that ran back in the summer of 1981 which talks about the then current state of the movie novelization market. It's rare to find articles centered on the subject in general, but even rarer to find one that digs into the behind-the-scenes sales, author advances, and licensing numbers. We've always been fascinated by the financial information associated with pop culture, be it the box office figures of movies, or the sales goals of publishers that determine success or failure for book releases. This piece, titled...

I Read Movies – E.T. in his Adventures on Earth

On a recent episode of the I Read Movies podcast, host Paxton Holley digs into the weird and wonderful novelization for E.T. the Extra Terrestrial titled E.T. in his Adventures on Earth written by William Kotzwinkle and published in 1982. This is a very zany book told directly from the perspective of the E.T. character and the story is chock full of all sorts of interesting perspectives and tangents not seen in the film. Paxton navigates listeners through the maze of weirdness in this really entertaining episode of the show that we highly...

I Read Movies – A Nightmare on Elm Street, Parts 1-3

Just in time for the Halloween season, host of the I Read Movies podcast Paxton Holley dives into a very special horror novelization that covers not one, but three movies in the A Nightmare on Elm Street franchise. Written by Jeffrey Cooper in 1987, The Nightmares on Elm street is the first in a two novelization series that covers the first five Elm Street movies. But how do the novelizations hold up? Listen as Paxton digs into the first book to discuss just...

I Read Movies – Gremlins

Last Year we joined Host Paxton Holley on his I Read Movies podcast to talk about the wacky novelization of Gremlins written by George Gipe and published in 1984. Gipe is sort of notorious for his short but amazing body of adaptation work including the tie-ins for The Explorers and Back to the Future. His work tends to stray fairly far from the source material which makes his work very interesting. Sadly, Gipe passed away in 1986 shortly after adapting The Explorers, so there is not a lot known about his process, but Paxton and Shawn (one of the editors of this site) have a great time...

I Read Movies – The Lost Boys

On the latest episode of the I Read Movies podcast, host Paxton Holley is joined by pop culture historian Noel Thingvall to dig into the 1987 novelization of The Lost Boys adapted by the talented and prolific author Craig Shaw Gardner. Copies of Gardner's novelization are fairly rare and fetch upwards of $100 on the secondary market, so let Pax and Noel save you some bucks while they discuss how the book differs from the popular film. You can find the show on iTunes, Stitcher, or Google Play, or you can also stream it...

WTF did I just read: Ghostbusters

One of the largest hurdles in collecting movie novelizations is a devastating mixture of rarity and expense. Though on the whole, movie novelizations tend to be fairly cheap and moderately easy to find in better used book stores, there are a decent number of highly coveted titles, a lot of which are for some pretty popular films. So, say you're a fan of horror films and you're looking for copies of the Friday the 13th or Halloween novelizations. Unless you're willing to part with at least $100 per volume, usually sight unseen via sellers on eBay or Amazon third-party, you're probably...

From Book to Screen to Book Again

Adaptation is a strange animal. How stories come to be presented in general can be an odd process, especially in modern times where collaboration and the lending of ideas from one writer to another is common. Or when you consider that most film scripts these days pass through not one or two writers, but usually upwards of six to ten in a "writer's room". It's not uncommon for studios to bring in well-known comedians to "punch up" family, animated and comedy scripts to get the most laughs per minute. Heck, before a script can even be adapted into a novelization, it has often already been...